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Almanac

United States of America (Navy)

Capital: Washington D.C.Official Language: EnglishArmed Forces Personnel: 323.225Medical Officers: n/aMilitary Hospitals / Institutes: 4/2Missions: multiple
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Surgeon General
Clinton Forrest Faison
Vice Admiral

7700 Arlington Blvd. Ste 5113
Falls Church, VA 22042-5113
USA

Basic Task of the Military Medical Service
Navy Medicine is a global health care network of 63.000 personnel that provide health care support to the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, their families and veterans in high operational tempo environments, at expeditionary medical facilities, medical treatment facilities, hospitals, clinics, hospital ships and research units around the world.

Priorities:
Readiness: Ensuring that lives are saved wherever Navy and Marine Corps forces operate is what Navy Medicine does, be it above the sea, on the sea, below the sea or on the battlefield. Navy Medicine provides robust clinical experience for personnel to preserve their life-saving skills and competencies using a holistic approach to achieve medical capabilities that are ready and relevant wherever the Navy and Marine Corps operates, today and tomorrow.

Health: Navy Medicine’s medical professionals provide the best care possible to Sailors, Marines, and their families to keep them healthy, ready and on the job. Navy Medicine treats patients like family through enhanced access to care and eliminating patient harm by anticipating, identifying, resolving, and sharing best practices, enabling them lead the nation in quality and safety.

 Partnerships: Navy Medicine is strengthening its ties with Army and Air Force medical services, civilian health care organizations, government agencies and leading academic and research institutions. Doing this maximizes the readiness and health of the Navy and Marine Corps team by identifying and removing barriers to develop strong alliances and partnerships.

Structure
Navy Medicine Headquarters

Since its establishment in August 1842, the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED) serves as the headquarters for all naval medical personnel. Under Vice Adm. Forrest Faison’s leadership as the Navy surgeon general, and chief, BUMED, Navy Medicine ensures Sailors, Marines, their families and retirees are healthy, ready, and on the job. BUMED is physically located within Defense Health Headquarters (DHHQ) in Falls Church, Virginia, just a few miles from the nation’s capital. More than 300 Sailors and more than 400 Navy civilians work together with contractor counterparts to develop policy and manage manpower, personnel and resources throughout the enterprise. BUMED also oversees Navy Medicine’s medical operations, research and development, and educational programs.

Navy Medicine
Navy and Marine Corps health care providers are distinguished by five distinct corps. Each corps is comprised of personnel who specialize in particular health care fields, such as nursing or dentistry. Together, these corps represent Navy Medicine’s active duty and reserve service members who ensure the health and well-being of every Sailor, Marine and Navy Medicine beneficiary around the world. These corps work side by side with Navy civilians who supplement the military medical force in all areas from administrative work to medical professionals.

Personnel
• Medical Corps
– 4.500 active duty and reserve
• Hospital Corps
– 30.000 active duty and reserve
• Nurse Corps
– 4.000 active duty and reserve
– Dental Corps 1.400 active duty and reserve
• Medical Service Corps
– 3.000 active duty and reserve

Expeditionary Medicine
When Sailors and Marines go forward into harm’s way, Navy Medicine is there beside them on, above, below the sea and on the battlefield.

Education and Training
Navy Medicine is committed to delivering high-value, highimpact education and training to enhance the professional development and readiness of health care providers.

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Garrison Health Care
Patient and family-centered care is Navy Medicine’s core philosophy and approach, providing comprehensive medical care for all Navy Medicine beneficiaries any-time, any-where.

Research and Development
Navy Medicine research and development programs enable us to remain agile in the world-class health care provided to service members and beneficiaries.

Warrior Care
Navy Medicine provides a seamless transition from battlefield to bedside to a robust reintegration support system so warriors can lead productive lives.

Global Health Engagement
Global health partnerships create opportunities to engage with other nations, build long-lasting mutual relationships, and improve the readiness of the Navy and Marine Corps.

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Hospital Ships
USNS Comfort (T-AH 20)
– the Navy’s East Coast hospital Photo  ship, supported by NME staff, is a level III military treatment facility that provides rapid, flexible, and mobile acute health service support to Marine Corps, Army and Air Force units deployed ashore, and naval amphibious task and battle forces afloat. Its secondary mission is to provide mobile surgical hospital service and acute medical care in disaster or humanitarian relief.

USNS Mercy (T-AH 19) – the Navy’s West Coast hospital ship, is a level III military treatment facility that provides rapid, flexible, and mobile acute health service support to Marine Corps, Army and Air Force units deployed ashore, and naval amphibious Photo  task and battle forces afloat. Its secondary mission is to provide mobile surgical hospital service and acute medical care in disaster or humanitarian relief. From May – September 2016, Mercy participated in Pacific Partnership, an annual humanitarian and civic assistance mission designed to strengthen regional relationships and increase interoperability between the United States, partner nations, and international humanitarian and relief organizations.